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with building central government capacity, which is one of the objectives of the united states and its partners. it may be portant for security gains in the short run, but it poses a long term issue. >> it sounds similar to the approach general petrais employed in iraq. is it similar or different? >> it's very different. the tribes came to the united states and asked for our help in dealing with al qaeda, which was in their midst. al qaeda were outsiders in iraq, and governing in certain parts of the anbar province. the locals didn't like that, and they wanted u.s. help in getting rid of al qaeda. they came to the united states and the united states responded to help them. in afghanistan, it's not so clear that the initiative is coming from the local communities. it seems much more driven by the international community to address the security situation, and that means that the dynamics are going to be very different than what they were in iraq. >> in terms of the obstacles to the approach in afghanistan, what would you say the main ones are, that did not exist in iraq? >> the main one is that i
of the united states military is we grow and develop people. i mean i've had dozens of these interviews with people, okay, you're getting a few job. this is turning over a new leaf. this is a time to go get it. we've seen people turn their lives around. this is one of the great things about our institution. so clearly these are issues that the policymakers have to come to grips with. our task was put the spotlight on policies, weaknesses, gaps, that's what we have tried to do. i do believe there may be places where barriers should be retained in some way. >> and maybe for some. >> for some purpose. >> maybe promotions or -- >> exactly. >> whether it's a security issue. >> exactly. but what i'm suggesting is that people who are responsible for these policy decisions know what the vital dots look like. they know where they come from. as i -- the report said and in my earlier testimony, the time has passed for us to be having the turf wars on who owns the information. >> i couldn't agree with you more. this is a major challenge for all of us in the senate and house and committee and being
interference even as the united states reportedly is more deeply involved than ever in secret military missions there. >>> united states and russia move closer to a new deal to reduce nuclear arm. has president obama succeeded in the resetting relations with moscow? >>> on the 65th anniversary of the liberation of the auschwitz nazi death camp, we will show you how survivors are coping all these years later. >>> and the smash hit "avatar" makes its way to china. it's that or a new film about the life of confucius. >>> from the different perspectives of reporters and analysts from around the globe, this is "worldfocus." major support has been provided by rosalind p. walter and the peter g. peterson foundation, dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. and additional funding is provided by the following supporters -- >>> good evening. i'm daljit dhaliwal in new york. we begin tonight with the issue of terrorism and the escalating battle against it in yemen. shortly after the attempted bombing of the u.s. jetliner on christmas day,
and the united states. in fact, many of the country's use proportional representation, public financing of campaigns. >> we might back up and explain proportional representation. it is not well understood in america at all. >> it is not. the quickest explanation is it produces multi-party democracy. >> some time to many parties like in italy -- not in ireland, that is proportional, but it actually has three. >> you can fine-tune your democracy by setting what you call a victory threshold. how many parties. in the unites the states with a system that is democrat or republican in many districts and most districts are so non- competitive we can tell you who will wind. >> in short hand, first past the post. >> winner-take-all. >> it has worked very well in the uk. periodically the labour party says it will go to proportional representation and then they realized they may lose some of the viability and backs off it. there are a lot of use of europe and america that it is old, that it is bureaucratic beyond belief, that it is overtaxed, that people don't work hard enough, that it is not compe
been this delay. >> the former president of the united states, bill clinton, take it, has been spending time with the president today at the white house. what do weigh know about this? >> you know, it is interesting because we saw him come here to the white house to have a meeting with the president. we asked about that when we saw him arrive here. we were told that he came and was simply in town. and came here to stop by and meet with the president and also meet with other officials here at the white house. we don't know if he's still here. . beyond that we don't know anything else about that meeting. it does seem interesting the timing of this while this is all taking place, the former president, bill clinton did come by the white house. >> stand by. we will be getting back to you. once again, we are awaiting the president. he's supposed to come out around 4:30 p.m. eastern, 27 minutes or so from now. let's bring in our -- our panel, national security contributor, fran townsend, former homeland security adviser to president bush. also with us, national security analyst peter bergen. s
barack obama, the u.s. president, that there will be further attacks on the united states unless he takes steps to resolve the palestinian situation. in an audiotape obtained by al- jazeera on sunday, the al qaeda chief, praised the nigerian accused of the christmas day bombing." we would give a listen to a translation of that tape. -- we will get a listen to a translation of that tape. >> made peace beyond those that osama bin laden brings guidance to. our message, carried by words, conveyed to you through the flame of the hero, we have proved that the heroes of 9/11 can be effective. the message is that america will never dream of living in peace unless we lived it in palestine. it is not fear -- it is not fair that you enjoy a safe life while our brothers in gaza suffered greatly. with god's will, we will continue as long as you continue to support israel. peace be on those that follow the lead of guidance. host: that tape was released yesterday. first, a quick political note, marion barry is set to announce his retirement after seven terms, according to two sources. the move would mak
focus by the united states on the problems of terrorism and in giving assistance to the government of yemen and following 2003 when there was a sense that al qaeda had been defeat indeed yemen, much of that dropped off. the amount 06 attention, the amount of resources that we gave to yemen dropped off significantly. and since 2006, with the reconstitution of al qaeda in yemen, only platedly has the united states sort of focused again on the problem there and of course the reason why we're talking about it this morning is because omar farooq aomar that took took omar farooq kathwari was coming from yemen. caller: my question is how long have we been with this war against yemen? i mean, i don't mean to go to a conspiracy theory but i read in ha general petraeus and another went down there so when tough head of arms services committee go to yemen, they are not just going to see if it's -- >> well, i wouldn't characterize it at all as a war in yemen. and senator mccain is my former boss. i worked for him for 5 1/2 years on foreign policy and so i can state categorically what was on his
-election to the united states senate. on each of these occasions, i have begun my remarks by observing that every important journey in life begins and ends at home. today is no exception. what is different about today, however, is not to announce the beginning of yet another campaign for the united states senate, but rather to announce that after 35 years of representing the people of connecticut and the united states congress, i will not be a candidate for re-election this november. i want to begin these very brief remarks by expressing my deepest gratitude to the wonderful people of connecticut for the remarkable privilege of being elected eight times over the past four decades to our national assembly. you have honored me beyond words with your confidence. let me quickly add that there have been times when my positions and actions have caused some of you to question that confidence. i regret that. but it is equally important that you know that i have never wavered in my determination to do the best job for our state and our nation. i love my job as your senator. i always have, still do. howeve
heading to the united states, something our audience already was well familiar with. >> regarding the report specifically on the christmas incident, we were told by general jones that it would contain shocking information. as it turns out, i couldn't find anything new in there. what do we though about how much of it is still classified? >> reporter: we don't know how much remains classified. we may never know that. what we do know is this process today was delayed twice. the president was originally supposed to talk to us at 1:00 a.m., then 3 p.m ultimately it was 4:30 p.m why? because of a rather intensive debate about what to keep classified and what to declassify. what we do learn is that there was a fundamental break down in this new system of applied and created after 9-11. the c.i.a. and the national counterterrorism center are supposed to deal with each other and deal with each other rapidly and cooperatively. that didn't happen. let me read one key part of the report that talks about this break down. quote, the intentional redundancy in the system should have added an addi
a series of recalls and stopped the united states sales and production of eight popular models after reports of instances in which the gas pedal became stuck and caused the car to race out of control. >> in developing news, another recall from a japan automaker, honda. laura ingle is live with that. which model are effected? >> we're talking about 646,000 models of the compact car fit. we have a picture to show you. what we're talking about here is the 2007-2008 model. if you have a 2009 or 2010 you're reportedly okay. it's a massive recall that will send a lot of honda owners double checking their make and model. the honored recall involves overheating issues. driver's side master power window switch. it reportedly can overheat causing a fire when it comes into content with excessive liquid. honda says an example would be heavy rain. there have been seven reported incidents. >> shepard: what should owners do if they have a fit? >> keep a close eye on the driver's side door switch. recall is voluntary, we're hearing from honda that drives are not being advised to bring cars to dealer
of the united states and everybody should come here to see it. and i'm delighted to be back here again. now this book, which is a big fat book can be used as a doorstop if you decide not to read it. it will work that way. the title of the book comes in the statement of jefferson. he referred to the united states, jefferson being the most expansive mind and president in history. he referred to the united states and he was president as an empire of liberty, a different kind of empire is what he saw. indeed, as i said, had great visions for the growth of this united states. i've introduced this book with a little brief description of rip van winkle's -- washington irving story, rip van winkle, which i think captures some of the extraordinary changes that took place in this. in 1789 and 1815. in fact, from the revolution to the second decade of the 19th century. irving, who was conservative and conservative sensibilities, wrote the short story which i think is his most famous short story, most of you are familiar with it. in the second decade of the 19th century. i think he was trying to expres
him into the united states and britain. so this is the kind of threat where it's maybe an individual now rather than in one particular cell that al qaeda can utilize in this type of aircraft attack. >> there's still a lot of unfinished work today-to-do for the obama administration in reforming the way intelligence is shared inside the u.s. bureaucracy for looking at the problem of signal to noise in the system, wrefb information is shared, how do you distinguish reliable and important information from false reporting and misleading reporting. there's... anyone who works in the system who deals with threat reporting testifies that there is an enormous amount of noise in the system. and even if you share the noise, that doesn't actually create the clarity you need to act against real threats. >> yemen is a country's in great chaos at the moment. there's a civil war in the north draining off a lot of military resources at the moment. there's a separate insurgency which is increasingly violent in the south. the government is running out of money as it loses oil exports and so i think wha
students from all over the united states. i've been associated with this program as faculty director for about 10 years. and this is a program which is very dear to my heart. and we have consistently had some of the best, most authoritative speakers available. and cerda, this is true of juan zarate. there is a scene in the 1975 movie about the watergate invasion, all the presidents men. and there's a meeting in an underground washington garage and watch how holbrook, playing an informant known by the name of deep throat, tells robert redford playing bob warburg, the "washington post" reporter, that if he wants to find out who is responsible for the water great burglary, at democratic party headquarters, at the watergate, you should follow the money. well, we have some here today who has followed money. in his capacity as deputy assistant secretary of the treasury. and this was a job that really involves one of the most complex tasks in the antiterrorism effort. that have these people get their money, how they spend their money, and it takes a person with uncommon diligence and uncomm
blacks. the united states, for example, didn't recognize haiti for the first 58 years of its existence until 1862, a year after the u.s. civil war began. that was the official beginning of what continues to this day to be a difficult relationship. in 1915, the u.s. sent in landing force to occupy the island nation and haitian president had just been assassinateded and the country was in a state of chaos and some say america wanted to protect its investments there. whatever the reasons for coming, the americans stayed for almost 20 years. and it was an often brutally occupation. the americans under franklin roosevelt withdrew but essentially of their own volleynition 1934. haiti remained a trouble and deeply chaotic place. 60 years later, they were back. in 1994, under the clinton administration, the american military fwhent again. this time, they came to restore democracy and two years later, haiti saw for the first time in its then almost 200-year history peaceful transition of power from one democratically elected president to another. then the earthquake. and late wednesday afternoo
, the world was weary of this nation. the united states, for example, didn't recognize haiti for the first 58 years of its existence until 1862, a year after the u.s. civil war began. and that was the official beginning of what continues to this day to be a difficult relationship. in 1915, the u.s. sent in a landing force to occupy the nation and the country was in a state of chaos and some said america simply wanted to protect its investments there. whatever the reasons for coming, the americans stayed for almost 20 years. and it was an often brutal occupation. the americans under franklin eleanor roosevelt withdrew in 1934. haiti remained a troubled and deeply chaotic place. 60 years later, they were back and in 1994 under the clinton administration, the american military went in again. this time they came to restore democracy and two years later haiti saw for the first time in its then almost 200-year history a peaceful transition of power from one democratically elected president to another. but then the earthquake and late wednesday afternoon, of course, america returned again. this time
just returned from yemen. you had talks with the president of yemen. is the united states going to have direct involvement there, in other words, troops on the ground or launching strikes from inside yemen? >> well, in fact, you taukd to the yemeni foreign minister, as well, and he was quite clear that yemen does not want to have american ground troops there and that's a good, good response for us to hear, certainly. >> wonderful ground troops there. >> no, of course, we would always want a host nation to deal with a problem itself. we want to help, we're providing assistance so we're going to provide more assistance in the course of this year than we did last year and after i think having zeerode it out back, if you recall, '08. this is an effort that we want to help them to deal with a problem that threatens their very rid of government and their very existence as you know it. >> you talk about providing more aid. from what i can gather, aide w increased by $2 trillion in 2008 and 2010. you said when you were there it was going to double this year or next year. is that going to happe
for the first time in the united states a cap and trade system. that process is moving forward in ways that if you had talked about it just two to three months ago, would have seemed impossible. so i'm actually -- this is obama -- so i'm actually more optimistic than i was about america being able to take leadership on the issue, joining europe which over the last several years has been ahead of us on this issue. and he was awarded a nobel peace prize. after years of politicians refusing to take action on cutting greenhouse gas emissions, there is a positive shift in washington. there is legislation moving through the senate now that you just heard about and that we hope will get passed in time for the big be international meeting in copenhagen in december. in hopenhagen. [laughter] i love that. i am optimistic and more so now than ever before. this is the most important moral problem of our time, and i believe that with with your help and all of us working together that we are on our way to solving it. the political will is developing, and state by state the across the united states l
. >>> the president of the united states getting ready to address the nation from the white house. as soon as he goes to the microphone, you'll hear what he has to say on the failed terror attack in detroit, outside detroit on christmas day. we'll go there live, you'll hear everything. in the meantime, let's check in with jack cafferty. he has today's "cafferty file." >> some say it's past time to begin profiling passengers. the u.s. is demanding better koreaning from places like iran, pakistan, saudi arabia, yemen, the usual suspects. the screening is to include things like full body scans, patdowns, searches of carry-on bags, and explosive detection technology. from the school of common sense comes the idea it makes sense to more thoroughly screen passengers who come from cunning where they may have been exposed to radical islamic teaching, but improved technology isn't the answer. the head of security for el al, says we need better questioning of passengers. he suggests hiring well-educated, highly trained agents, who know what to look for. he says profiling isn't about single out certain ethnic g
of those who have been arrested, engaged in or having committed terrorist acts in the united states in the last month were in communication with persons on the internet. they never met the necessarily in person but they were highly influenced by their messaging. i gave a speech about a week ago really defending strongly internet freedom but i also pointed out that the internet is a neutral tool, and increasingly we are having to face, whether it is the u.s., u.k. or yemen, the threats coming from beyond our borders that cannot be, as david said come up ginned on any event in a particular place. it is an accumulation of influences, and i think we have to look more thoughtfully at this and i think there is a role for the free media to play because we need a countermessage to young people, who for whatever reason, seek out these voices of the extremism, and i think that is something that governments need help in doing on both a technological basis and in terms of the media's narrative. >> we will definitely take another question but thank you very much indeed. [laughter] >> on tomorrow
sense of energy that you always have at this time, just before the president of the united states comes in and speaks before the entire u.s. congress. the difference now is that that electricity has a sense of uncertainty in it, a big sense of uncertainty, and anxiety among democrats who didn't think that they would have this much anxiety this early in an election year but i got to tell you, still the overwhelming sense, even more than a week after the election in massachusetts is a sense of shock among democrats, and that is the kind of audience predominantly that the president is going to be facing here. ed was talking about health care. we know that that is in dire straights. all day long democratic leaders trying to figure out how to salvage that and jobs, what everybody wants to hear the president talk about. when it comes to the senate because they don't have that 60-vote majority anymore, we're already hearing that they're trying to scale back that, and maybe from their perspective, call the republicans' bluff a little bit and try to put forward some of the issues that they think
-- the world's leading communication nation, the united states, has been at least until recently outcommunicated by mass murdered living in the most remote areas of afghanistan and pakistan. and we have to take the public information space back from the enemy in order to succeed. and ashley is pioneered such creative ideas as using cell phone technology and such obviously ideas as countering their abuse of low wattage fm station to say terrible lies. next to her, is valley nee 15. he came to us from and has just written another one of the wonderful books. he was working on pakistan for us and not on iran, since that always appeared in the blogs inaccurately. i think we are missing someone. tim who came to us from afghanistan. a representing the future of the foreign service. we have a whole lot of other people in the back there, including in the department, from nine other agent sis plus the state department. strobe, what i'd like to say, the most common question i get in when i walk down the street or run into people is the most valid. why are we in afghanistan? that's a fair qu
places on the face of the planet. but this bill is about priorities on the united states of america. we are $12 trillion in debt. we're spending $600 million a day just in interest on that debt. this congress momentarilyly is going to have to raise -- moltary is going to have to raise the debt ceiling another $1 trillion. we don't have the money to do this. currently the national park service has an estimated $9 billion in backlog. $9 billion that they need to help with the national parks to preserve and to upgrade what we already have in our current holding. what the president will probably say in less than eight hours, create this air of oh, we have to be a little fiscally responsible. we ought to freeze a few things. for the second time in just over a week here we are going to come and look at this bill to acquire at the cost of $40 million to $50 million property with funds that we don't have. no longer can this government continue to use the government credit card -- decide to vote in favorite of this bill although it's just an authorization, although it's not an appropriation, are
in the united states and the government raised the rates which is how fiscal stimulus in the united kingdom -- the governor of the bank of england said president obama's proposal is much more serious than the prime minister's. he couldn't think of anyone internationally who was enthusiastic about the prime minister's ideas. the third aspect of banking reform, a growing content that the only sensible banks have the ability and know-how to maintain proper supervision of the banks. the prime minister took that power from the bank of england in 1997 and created a system that failed. given countries like the united states and germany who want their banks to have more responsibility for banking supervision will the government change that policy and adopt that approach as well? >> what america has been doing is dealing with a very fragmented situation of regulation which has no fewer than eight regulators. we have rationalized the system of regulation. the organizations have the right powers within the right framework and that is what the financial services bill and other measures to determine to
and ally to united states and the partnership between our countries is -- a new beginning, based on mutual respect and mutual interest that the president called for in cairo. we will discuss how to deepen and broaden our partnership. among the matters that we consulted on -- the situation in yemen is a top concern. how can we work together and with others to stabilize yemen? assist in securing its borders and providing for its people in combating al qaeda? the instability in yemen is a threat to regional and global stability. and we are working with qatar and others to think of the best way forward to duck -- to try to deal with the security concerns. certainly, we know that this is a difficult set of challenges but they have to be addressed. i also thank the prime minister for their efforts to facilitate an end to the crisis in darfur and to promote security and stability in the broader middle east as well as africa. we both have a shared, mutual interest in moving towards a comprehensive peace between israelis and palestinians. we share the goal of an amendment -- an independent and viab
immigrants living here in the united states. because of the earthquake they will be granted 18 months of temporary protective status. >> tps is what it's called. while haitians here see it as an opportunity to push for changes, our ed lavandera says it's not an open invitation for haitians to come over. >> reporter: thousands of haitian immigrants, many in the united states illegally, are applying for what's called temporary protective status or tps. it allows haitian nationals to live in the u.s. legally for the next 18 months. for years, haitian americans lobbied for tps but many advocates now see an opportunity to make bigger changes, to ease years of immigration restrictions towards haitians coming to the united states. >> this now is an opportunity for haiti to change. this is the time right now. and many people this is the last time. a lot of people feel like this is our time. >> reporter: horrifying images like these have been common in the ocean waters between the united states and haiti. it's a dangerous and deadly journey for many who try to make it to american shores. every
in the wake of this, of course, very frightening event that happened on christmas day in the united states when there was a failed bomb attack. people's nerves are very much on edge. there is also a dark humor that permeates some sectors of society. we've heard of different people making jokes in different airports and it is not a joking matter right now. so we know that these people may have been drinking. they've been arrested. >> excuse me for just a second. sky news is interviewing live. they're the fox news equivalent for london. listen. >> did they, from your viewpoint, make their way directly to that passenger? >> in an instant. it happened straight away. they were very efficient and effective in their arrest. >> what reaction from him when he was made aware of what was happening to him? >> he seemed pretty calm. there was no shouting, no screaming. i think he sort of gave in straight away. >> reporter: you say two arrests were made. did you see the second person being taken from the aircraft? >> i didn't see the second person. i heard that through some other passengers on board. >>
that are due here, bound here for the united states and, of course, also that intelligence review under way to take into account all of the different agencies and, david, they're all going to meet here tuesday in the situation room after the president returns from his vacation. the president is going to hear from them in person individually. david? >> speaking of the situation room, people may be confused. when we report on events, this bombing in pakistan, 40 killed at a volleyball tournament, how does information go from the situation room to the president? is there somebody who essentially represents the situation room with the president in hawaii, who keeps the president up to speed? >> reporter: the president has a full complement of staff with him in hawaii. of course another entity that has come under fire here was created after 9/11 by an upshot of the committee recommendations, the national terrorism center, that is supposed to assimilate all the information and connect the dots, a phrase we're hearing again in the last few days as we heard after 9/11. all the information we're tal
, some in the united states. we used our proper names, told our back grounds. the people we met with, counter parties on the russian side used phony names. one was stations in seattle, silicon valley, one in washington. so, the game that got played is to thwart anything we would do. this is the group we had to work with. there we are looking in the open source trying to gain the cooperation from these other people, where we got absolutely nowhere. they played with us. but what did work is a lot of people came forward with information. some accurate, some inaccurate. so you have to parse through it. >> charlie: what was the most interesting information that came forward? >> the single most intriguing were a series of commodity related businesses that traded off getting commodities out of russia. things like a moa pneumonia, fertilizer. these were basic money laundering operations for them. they operated all over the world. when these things happen some of it always sticks to the fingers of the people responsible for distributing it. it doesn't all go to the place intended. so what hap
. in germany, is "kussler." it is a german name. in the united states it is "kessler." i am not sure if this is a result of american difficulty with foreign languages, although this country is absolutely crammed with people from every country of the world. or maybe it was just before he appeared here and tell people how to pronounce his name. it is generally "kessler." in europe it is "kussler." >> how many years have you spent with him in your life? >> we are talking 20 years. when i say 20 years, i spent that time teaching, so 20 years of vacations interspersed with sabbaticals. >> teaching where? >> i was teaching at cornell until 1994 and then i moved to columbia to teach nonfiction writing and translation which is my other hat that i wear. >> so, you are meeting with him. >> back in 1972, i founded a magazine called "index on censorship." as its name implies, it was about censorship in the arts and censorship of political books as well. i edited this for eight years until 1980 when i resigned to write my first biography which was of another man. souls and need soolzhynitsen i wa
in yemen is an organization that can reach out and touch the united states. that's a major reason general david petraeus went to yemen over the weekend and met with the president there and took messages and we are told pieces of information, and that's a direct quote from a senior u.s. official. pieces of information to president obama. the bottom line they are talking about targeting al qaeda. general petraeus made rare open remarks about yemen over the weekend. >> it's a country that has a lot of challenges. the reduction in oil production, although gas is going up, thankfully. many of the challenges of countries that are in the process of development, rugged terrain, tribal areas and so forth. and so very important, indeed, that yemen has taken the actions that it has, and indeed that not just the united states, but countries in the region, its neighbors and so forth have provided significant assistance. >> what comes next, heidi? yemen has taken actions. there will be more sharing of intelligence and more targeting information, and more training and equipping of yemenen security force
. >>> and united states and great britain closing their embassies in yemen, citing a specific, credible ongoing threat from al qaeda. it's unclear how long the embassies will remain closed. is yemen the new front in the war on terror? we're live in dubai with our security watch this morning. >>> we begin with tough new security measures facing every passenger flying to america from 14 high-risk nations, those nations are considered sponsors of terrorism or countries of interest by the transportation security administration. the new rules take effect this morning. our homeland security correspondent jean mene meserve live. >> reporter: all passengers on flights heading into the united states will be subject to random screening, and those flying in from certain countries will be required to go through enhanced screenings, such as full-body pat-downs, carry on bag searches, full body scanning and explosive detection swabs, this according to a new security directive issued by the transportation security administration, and now in effect. the countries include those that are officially listed by the
for the american people working in partnership with the president of the united states. >> congresswoman sheila jackson lee. democrat of texas and coming up next is a democrat of california also who dressed in red i that a member of the foreign affairs committee. and congresswoman, if you could stand on the x we would appreciate it. thank you very much. i appreciate that. what is one thing the president said tonight and you disagree with? >> i don't think there was much there that i disagreed with, and you could tell by the way i stood up and cheered. i think it was brilliant because he hit every single issue that concerns all of us across the board. he talked about freezing discretionary funds in 2013. >> and you agree with that? >> and i agreed with that. but he said there are programs we have to continue to see that they are funded. medicare, medicaid, social security. these programs that are the safety net for our country. he talked about the capping student loan fees for payback. he talked about our children being able to go into the community colleges that everyone has a right to good edu
an executive order granting interpol and certain rights and immunities here in the united states. some are wondering if that has caused an opening for interpol to have extraordinary police powers in the united states. a requested it? -- who requested it? >> the executive order updated interpol's status based on the fact that within the fast five years -- past five years they have opened an office to assist in the type of information sharing between governments that we all know that is so important. all that does is simply bring them and given the same privileges and responsibilities that many other international organizations have in this country like the iea, imf, the red cross. >> it does not give them police powers? >> absolutely not. >> can you tell me whether any questions that took place here at the white house questions whether or not he would be tried as an enemy combatant? >> whether the conversations took place here at the white house? >> whether the 23-year-old should be tried as an enemy combatant. >> i would say a lot of subjects were covered in the situation room in terms
as techs and resources stocks weigh. and i'm mike huckman in the united states. the economy likely grew at the fastest pace in four years in the fourth quarter, but experts say don't start celebrating just yet. >> hello and welcome to today's program. i'm once again here at the annual meeting of the world economic forum in davos. maria will be joining us shortly, as well. we have a great guest list for you today. we'll be joined we the chief executive of bank of america, brian moynihan. we'll talk to christine lagarde, the french finance minister. we'll be joined by lord mannedelson, amongst a whole host of other guests. we'll be joined by the ceo of china mobile. but before all of that, there's plenty we need to bring you to. christine, over to you. >> hey, ross, good to see you in davos. let's do a quick view where asian markets are trading today. we have earnings in the u.s. are failing to disappoint. they hit some of the tech sector stocks here in asia. of course, we have those concerns about greece and portugal and that seems to be weighing on sentiment, as well. the hang seng off
speaker -- >> the president of the united states. >> president entering the room. and as you said, a number of these congressmen and women get there very early, in fact, we were told the earliest got there at 8:00 a.m. to be on that aisle to shake hands with the president. >> and the president flanked by members of the democratic leadership, behind him, the democratic leader of the senate, harry reid, majority leader in the house, steny hoyer. >> we are expecting the president to speak perhaps more than an hour tonight. a little longer than the average length of the state of the union speech. >> he's got a lot of work to do, and i want to bring jake tapper in again. jake, lay out what you believe the white house goals are tonight coming into this speech. >> well, he has a few. first of all, with most of the country thinking that we are now on the wrong track, he has to say the state of our union is strong, but he has to convince the american people that that's true, when most of them right now are worried about the direction of the country. you alluded to reaching out to the cente
families and that all people of haitian dissent in the united states are in a position to contribute to their recovery. a senior economist at the world bank has projected that temporary protected status could generate an additional $360 million dollars in remittances sent to haiti in 2010. . . despite strong support from the united states, the same international participation for haiti is a vital to its recovery. it is especially important international community provide government assistance. limitations of the current government constrain prospects for recovery. these harsh these compound with the significant loss of linfe. the international community to consider measures. because of the devastation, haiti is near a failed state. we should consider an enhanced role for the united nations and the daily operations of the haitian government until the country is stable. this would include the provision of food and shelter, reconstruction, budgetary affairs, security, and other aspects vital to the haitian people. the united nations has the credibility and capacity to perform that role.
not on the no-fly list. >>> new rules went into effect for travelers flying to the united states from overseas. all passengers from or traveling through 14 countries considered high-risk are to receive full body patdowns and have their carry-on luggage opened and inspected. let's bring in tom costello. the new rules took into effect today. you were detailing how intense the security was, even yourself patted down head to toe. >> i was coming in from brussels, not on the list of countries that are considered high-risk. but nonetheless, perhaps an indication of what you can expect if you're traveling from one of those countries or even with enhanced security in europe. they did a patdown from my shoulder to my toes and around my waist. they had my open up my belt. the officer literally took his hands and felt inside my jeans around my waist, only my waist, but checking to see if i was wearing anything there. once we were on the flight the captain turned off the map about halfway across the atlantic ocean and 25 minutes or so before landing, all seat belts were secured and nobody was allowed to g
was the ultimate threat to the united states was when the worst weapons fell into the hands of the worst people. that led congress to create our commission to evaluate what is our level of preparation to avoid the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, particularly into the hands of terrorists. so it was appropriate that we started the day by giving back to the beginnings of this effort with families 9/11. our report on today comes eight years after 9/11. it comes one year after the publication of the report which was entitled world at risk, purposefully titled to indicate this is not one nation's problem, this is a global problem because it is the earth which is at risk, and one month after the failed attempt at an aviation bombing on christmas day there is some good news. the good news is particularly in the area of nuclear terrorism that the trend lines here seem to be running in the right direction. president obama has taken major steps to revitalize the non-proliferation regime and to encourage needed international cooperation. he's committed significant time and energy and resource
in the united states saying he's not guilty. this hour the dramatic scene inside the courtroom as he entered his plea and what comes next. >>> some muslim women say they're being stopped, searchened and even beating an airports sincely because they're wearing head scarves. is it part of the government's official policy? what's going on? >>> the republican national commit aye chairman under fire by members of his own party. they say michael steele needs to muzzle himself. >>> i'm wolf blitzer, you're in "the situation room." >>> his mug shot has been plastered all over the air waves and internet for weeks. today reporters got a better look at umar farouk abdulmutallab, the man charged with transcribing to blow up a u.s. airliner on christmas. our deborah feyerick was inside the courtroom when he entered the plea. she's joining us live from droimt. describe, deb, what happened. >> reporter: wolf, abdulmutallab walked in very, remember he's suffering lap burns have been detonated the bomb that was hidden in his underwear. he was wearing a white t-shirt and khaki pants, sneakers, his feet were shack
. there is a joint effort going on between the united states and the vietnamese government. to date in terms of resources dedicated by the united states on this effort roughly $4 million. just recently announced the contracting of 1.7 million, 1.69 to be more precise for the construction of a secured landfill. now i've been to the facility, and what has been done to date is effectively a containment effort. a way of trying to limit public access to contaminated soil, water, lakes, ponds as well as the creation of a catchment area to catching water that would be contaminated with dioxin so that does not spread further in the ecosystem. but this has now created a new situation which is say having contained the problem they are moving to clean up, and they're at least the last i heard is the question was do you just try to clean it up right away or basically move the contaminated soil out of the area and find a way of cleaning it up later. appears to have chosen to do the latter. that is to say move it to an area in a secure landfill and then find a way of trying to remove the dioxin from the e
has and most importantly visas that will get h into the unite states a britain. so this ishe kind ofhreat whe it's maybe individual now rather than inne particularcell th al qaeda cantilize in ts type of aircft attack. >> there's still a lot of unfinishedork today-to-do for the oba administration in reforming the w intelligence is shared inside the u.s. bureaucracy for loong at the probm of signal to noise in the syst, wrefb information is shared, howo you distinguish reliable and important informatio from fae reporting and misleading reporting. ere's... anyone who works in e system who dls with that reporting testifies that there is an enormous amount of noise in the system. and even if you share the noi, that doesn't actually create the clarity you need to act against real threats. >> yemen is a country's inreat chaos at t moment. there's a civil wa in the north draining off a l ofmilitary resources at e moment. there's a separate surgency which increasgly violent in the uth. the govement is running o of moneas it loses oi export and so i think what the u.s. needs to do is rea
in the united states and elsewhere and the vietnam war that was fought on the ground if the whole of the vietnam and communist, the rest would quickly follow. the so-called domino effect. as it happened the dominoes fell not in asia in the 1970's but eastern europe in 1989. we shouldn't forget either that thanks largely to the huge population of china, more than one-fifth of humanity still live under what may be regarded as communist rule. up until 1989 there were 16 communist states as i would define them. oddly there are 36 countries today which were at one time communist. that contradiction is to be explained by the fact the soviet union, one state broke up and became 15 states and czechoslovakia and yugoslavia also broke up so there'll be were 16 communist states but there were 36 countries that were communist and today there are five common is countries, china, vietnam, laos, north korea and cuba. the first three have been developing market economies on a substantial private sectors. the hybrid regimes, political economist economically not. china has been described as a state of party cabal
and in the south american countries compared to what you paid in the united states? also, canada and mexico. i understand canadian wages are much higher. guest: i would really need to bring the manufacturing teams to talk about the wage structure. they are probably the right expert on the topic. in general, we are focused on building great cars, trucks, and crossovers. we have a number of examples where we are building some small cars in the u.s. is clearly a competitive environment out there. we are comparing the wage structure. i would say the manufacturing side would be the best to answer the question. host: the general manager for chevrolet. thank you. more guests coming from the washington auto show. we will speak to representatives of florida and bmw. -- ford and bmw. mike from pennsylvania. no guest right now, but do you have a comment? caller: yes, i was a longtime fan of the pontiac division. i see the discontinued and that -- they discontinued that. that upsets me a little bit. how come they cannot focus more on environmentally-friendly vehicles? host: abilene, texas. lou on the repu
for president and people here in florida and for people all across the united states of america. [cheers and applause] >> i seem to remember coming to tampa two weeks before the election. and you know what i said, this is a quote. people can check. i'm sure it was reported in the newspapers. i said change never comes without a fight. that was true then. it's true now. change never comes without a fight, florida. so i won't stop fighting. i know you won't either. we aren't going to stop fighting to give our kids a world class education, to make college more affordable to make sure that by 2020 we have the highest rate of college attendance than any country in the world. [cheers and applause] >> so we propose that graduates should only pay 10% of their income to pay back their student loans. [cheers and applause] >> and what i have said is we'll forgive student loan after 20 years. but after 10, if you choose a career in public service and if you decide you want to be a teacher, if you decide you want to be a cop, if you're not making huge amounts of money, we don't want to discourage you
people flying into the united states will face tough new security measures. the tsa saying enhanced screening will focus on people flying through countries of interest such as yemen, pakistan and nigeria. the enhanced techniques include full-body patdowns, body scans and thorough searches of carry-on luggage. >>> 2010, as we were saying, good morning to you earlier, it has turned out already fairly deadly for the united states and its allies in afghanistan. nato saying four u.s. service members died in a roadside bomb yesterday. a british soldier was killed in a separate explosion. last year was the bloodiest for coalition forces since the war in afghanistan started. 514 service members died. united states has started deploying 30,000 more troops to fight the taliban. >>> look at this image that we found hanging off a building in former president jimmy carter's hometown of plains, georgia. witnesses told affiliate walb it's an effigy of president obama with a rope around its neck. and one person says it had a sign with the president's name on it. the secret service is now investigat
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